With all sorts of tools available like texting, blogging, tweeting and other forms of social media, the National Writing Project claims that today’s kids are writing more than ever.  And more and more teachers are having their students use a wide variety of digital tools to create projects.

But that raises some questions:

What is digital writing and is it different than “regular” writing?

Does writing and creating in a digital world require different literacies?

If there really are differences, how should they be taught and learned?

The National Writing Project tries to answer those questions with their latest book, Because Digital Writing Matters: Improving Student Writing in Online and Multimedia Environments.

“Today’s young people are using a range of digital tools to compose and create in new and exciting ways,” said Sharon J. Washington, executive director of the National Writing Project. “It is a game-changing moment for teachers of writing. The very notion of what it means to write is shifting, and educators are faced with adapting their teaching practices to integrate new technologies while redefining writing and learning for the 21st century.”

The book is designed to help teachers and students meet

the challenges of new digital literacies and to equip students with the technology-related communication skills they need to thrive in school and in the global workplace.

The NWP has also created a new web site called Digital Is that focuses on providing

a collection of ideas, reflections, and stories about what it means to teach writing in our digital, interconnected world. Read, discuss, and share ideas about teaching writing today.

Both seem like a natural for a departmental book study or PLC.

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